The Archangel PR [business] Blog

Building. Forward.

Posts Tagged ‘Tweet

Envy thy Enemy…

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Sometimes I envy my competition. I’m human; I can’t help it.

I also want her hat.

I look at my current struggles over money, time, sleep deprivation, family obligations. This is a constant juggling act that I’ve knowingly created and I eagerly jump into every day. Most of my day is consumed with the tasks that I need to perform, but there’s always a moment that comes and goes every week where I can’t help myself.

I need to know what my competition is doing. Better yet, I need to know HOW my competition is doing.

On the surface their website is sleeker and has more fresh content. What’s this? They actually paid cash for a new brick and mortar building? And in the hip, upcoming downtown spot that I’ve had my eye on for the past few years? I just saw the CEO at a business luncheon (that they sponsored). Someone handed me their fancy new business cards and said those dreaded words, “Have you heard? They’ve gone global.” Everyone at that company drives a Mercedes or a BMW. Oh, that’s a good reminder, my Nissan needs an oil change.

On the surface, the competition is kicking my butt.

When I feel myself getting caught up in these moments (and like I said, they come weekly), it helps when I’m reminded that I will never truly see what’s happening behind the scenes. Are layoffs the price of that new office, or that global expansion? Is the boss mortgaging the company’s future for the feel of a Mercedes today? Are their clients as fed up with their work as the rest of are about hearing about it.

Even beyond this is a feeling of guilt: I want my competition to succeed.

These are real people. They have real problems. And rather than walking around hoping that they fail, it would probably do wonders for my karma and energy to wish them nothing but success. Yes, I want success for my endeavors… and I truly want to be the best at whatever I put my mind to… but I know no good will come from my wishing misfortune on others.

After all I wouldn’t want others wishing these things on me.

So this week when I begin to look at what the competition has bought, sold, acquired, stolen, introduced, or how they have seemingly created the “next big thing”, I will strive to change my way of thinking.

Focus on what I’m doing only. Glances to the left and right are normal, but it’s not healthy to stare. Everyone succeeds and fails at their own pace. My moment in the sun is just around the corner.

Pretty soon someone else will be sweating me too.

Time to Learn from Your Mistakes!

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Whether we like it or not, we are all moving forward into the future. Some of us cling to old memories and stories of days long gone. We hold on to pictures of ourselves when we were young and compare them to recent pictures where we are decidedly less than young.

Last night I cleaned out the filing cabinets that hold my entire collective entrepreneur and business history. While I was looking through the invoices, the receipts, and the e-mails, I began to separate the papers into the ventures I considered successful (the ones that made me money) and the ones that I thought were epic bombs (the ones that lost me money).

I wasn’t stunned by what I saw.

The “failure” pile was immensely bigger than the “success” pile. I’ll tell you in all honesty, I was a bit crushed. The first decade of my business existence looked like a history lesson in “What Not To Do: 101.” In all, my failures should serve as a warning to others. Better yet, these failures should serve as a lesson for myself.

Both my success and my failure have brought me to the place I currently reside.

My success provides money and livelihood. It sustains me and allows me to purchase goods and even provides a shot of confidence. But my failures allow me something just as valuable: experience.

I value experience as much as I value education and/or money.

Everyone is different, but I hope that if you are ever at a point where you can stop and examine the last few years of your business or personal life, that you’ll count it all joy. These things are making you the person you are. The trials and tribulations of this (business) life will make you stronger if you allow it to.

If you learn a lesson from each failure, as well as each success, you’ll be that much stronger in the end.

@round the Webz…

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Great articles posted by a few incredible thought leaders… check them out if you have time (and if you’re reading this, you have time):

Ronn Torossian – CEO of 5WPR in NYC

**Check out his archive. Very useful information to be had there.**

Jonathan Fields – Author of ‘Career Renegade’ and ‘Awake @ the Wheel’ blogger.

**Check his archive out also. Also you can find his podcasts on iTunes… I highly recommend them.**

Julio Varela – Founder of v5, LLC.

**Julio (better known as Twitter’s @Julito77) is a major force in the world of PR, etc. in the Latino community. His brother is a pretty incredible singer too!**

check them out! Now!

I Bet She Has a Great Personali-tweet

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This is only my opinion but if you’re going to open a Twitter account in a corporate name, or you are representing yourself as a brand on Twitter, at least be personable. What I mean is, at least chat back, don’t just send out junk-tweets like ads on TV or spammy e-mails.

I don’t expect an hour long situation about non-sense but when a “company” tweets something along the following: “We’re running specials all day long; 20% off everything til close!” And you reply with a very simple “Which store location? What time do you close?”, is it too much to ask for a reply of “1034 McFaddin; 8pm”?

Yes, maybe the owner or company rep had a busy day and no time to reply OR they simply missed the message. Happens to everyone. So I decided to follow-up with a few more replies to their corporate tweets and still… no reply. So I sent a few direct messages about merchandise and website questions. Nothing.

Apparently, the owner or, more than likely, marketing director was told to open a Twitter account because it was a great way to engage customers and advertise AT them. So the obligatory 3-6 tweets a day are sent out “advertising” goods and services. A quick glance at their profile will reveal that I wasn’t the only one talking to the company and getting zero response.

Again, my point in all of this isn’t to dog the company. I hope small business owners who use Twitter will use it to become more transparent with their consumers and be human.

I’ll be sending another direct message to them with a link to this blog… maybe they’ll get the message, but given the history, probably not.